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How to Work With NASA

How to Work with NASA

NASA works with industry in many ways, from collaborations and partnerships to licensing agreements and contracts. Here is guidance on how to license NASA-patented technologies. To learn more about other options, contact NASA.

NASA Patent Licensing Process

Move your mouse over each step to learn more.


Contact us to discuss how NASA can help solve your technology challenges.

Carolyn BlakeAmes Research Center
Moffett Field, California 94035
Technology Transfer Office Chief:
Carolina Blake
Phone: (650) 604-0893
E-mail: carolina.blake@nasa.gov

Charlene GilbertJohnson Space Center
Houston, Texas 77058
Technology Transfer Office Chief:
Charlene Gilbert
Phone: (281) 483-0474
E-mail: charlene.e.gilbert@nasa.gov

Laura FobelArmstrong Flight Research Center
4800 Lilly Drive, Building 4839
Edwards, California 93523-0273
Technology Transfer Office Chief:
Laura Fobel
Phone: (661) 276-3967
E-mail: laura.j.fobel@nasa.gov

Dave MakufkaKennedy Space Center
Kennedy Space Center, Florida 32899
Technology Transfer Office Chief:
Dave Makufka
Phone: (321) 867-6227
E-mail: david.r.makufka@nasa.gov

Kim Dalgleish-MillerGlenn Research Center
21000 Brookpark Road
Cleveland, Ohio 44135
Technology Transfer Office Chief:
Kim Dalgleish-Miller
Phone: (216) 433-8047
E-mail: kimberly.a.dalgleish@nasa.gov

Kathy DezernLangley Research Center
Hampton, Virginia 23681-2199
Technology Transfer Office Chief:
Kathy Dezern
Phone: (757) 864-5704
E-mail: kathy.a.dezern@nasa.gov

Nona CheeksGoddard Space Flight Center
Greenbelt, Maryland 20771
Technology Transfer Office Chief:
Nona Cheeks
Phone: (301) 286-5810
E-mail: nona.k.cheeks@nasa.gov

Terry TaylorMarshall Space Flight Center
Marshall Space Flight Center, Alabama 35812
Technology Transfer Office Chief:
Terry Taylor
Phone: (256) 544-5916
E-mail: terry.taylor@nasa.gov

Dan LockneyNational Aeronautics and Space Administration
300 E Street, SW
Washington, DC 20546
Daniel Lockney, Technology Transfer Program Executive
Phone: (202) 358-2037
E-mail: daniel.p.lockney@nasa.gov






NASA Center Technology Transfer Offices

NASA center map ARC JPL AFRC JSC SSC KSC MSFC GRC LARC GSFC HQ

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NASA's Technology Transfer Program pursues the widest possible applications of agency technology to benefit US citizens. Through partnerships and licensing agreements with industry, the program ensures that NASA's investments in pioneering research find secondary uses to support the economy, create jobs, and improve quality of life.

NASA headquarters map iconNASA Headquarters provides leadership, policy, strategy, resource allocation, and media relations for technology transfer activities agency-wide. Visit the Technology Transfer Program at http://technology.nasa.gov

Technology transfer office map iconThe Technology Transfer Office at each of NASA's 10 field centers represent NASA's technology sources and manage center participation in technology transfer activities.

NASA Headquarters

NASA Headquarters provides leadership, policy, strategy, resource allocation, and media relations for technology transfer activities agency-wide. Visit the Technology Transfer Program at http://technology.nasa.gov

Goddard Space Flight Center

Planetary science, LIDAR, cryogenic systems, tracking, telemetry, remote sensing, command. http://techtransfer.gsfc.nasa.gov

Langley Research Center

Aerodynamics, flight systems, materials, structures, sensors, measurements, information sciences. http://technologygateway.nasa.gov

Glenn Research Center

Aeropropulsion, communications, energy technology, high-temperature materials research. http://technology.grc.nasa.gov

Marshall Space Flight Center

Materials, manufacturing, nondestructive evaluation, biotechnology, space propulsion, controls and dynamics, structures, microgravity processing. http://techtran.msfc.nasa.gov.

Kennedy Space Center

Fluids and fluid systems; materials evaluation; process engineering; command, control, and monitor systems; range systems; environmental engineering and management. http://technology.ksc.nasa.gov

Stennis Space Center

Propulsion systems, remote sensing, nonintrusive instrumentation. http://technology-ssc.ndc.nasa.gov

Johnson Space Center

Artificial intelligence and human-computer interface, life sciences, human space flight operations, avionics, sensors, communications. http://technology.jsc.nasa.gov

Armstrong Flight Research Center

Aerodynamics, aeronautics flight testing, aeropropulsion, flight systems, thermal testing, integrated systems test and validation. http://www.nasa.gov/offices/ipp/centers/dfrc

Jet Propulsion Laboratory

Near- and deep-space mission engineering, microspacecraft, space communications, information systems, remote sensing, robotics. http://scienceandtechnology.jpl.nasa.gov

Ames Research Center

Information technology, biotechnology, nanotechnology, aerospace operations systems, rotorcraft, and thermal protection systems. http://technology.arc.nasa.gov
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NASA Headquarters

NASA Headquarters provides leadership, policy, strategy, resource allocation, and media relations for technology transfer activities agency-wide. Visit the Technology Transfer Program at http://technology.nasa.gov

Goddard Space Flight Center

Planetary science, LIDAR, cryogenic systems, tracking, telemetry, remote sensing, command. http://techtransfer.gsfc.nasa.gov

Langley Research Center

Aerodynamics, flight systems, materials, structures, sensors, measurements, information sciences. http://technologygateway.nasa.gov

Glenn Research Center

Aeropropulsion, communications, energy technology, high-temperature materials research. http://technology.grc.nasa.gov

Marshall Space Flight Center

Materials, manufacturing, nondestructive evaluation, biotechnology, space propulsion, controls and dynamics, structures, microgravity processing. http://techtran.msfc.nasa.gov.

Kennedy Space Center

Fluids and fluid systems; materials evaluation; process engineering; command, control, and monitor systems; range systems; environmental engineering and management. http://technology.ksc.nasa.gov

Stennis Space Center

Propulsion systems, remote sensing, nonintrusive instrumentation. http://technology-ssc.ndc.nasa.gov

Johnson Space Center

Artificial intelligence and human-computer interface, life sciences, human space flight operations, avionics, sensors, communications. http://technology.jsc.nasa.gov

Armstrong Flight Research Center

Aerodynamics, aeronautics flight testing, aeropropulsion, flight systems, thermal testing, integrated systems test and validation. http://www.nasa.gov/offices/ipp/centers/dfrc

Jet Propulsion Laboratory

Near- and deep-space mission engineering, microspacecraft, space communications, information systems, remote sensing, robotics. http://scienceandtechnology.jpl.nasa.gov

Ames Research Center

Information technology, biotechnology, nanotechnology, aerospace operations systems, rotorcraft, and thermal protection systems. http://technology.arc.nasa.gov

Step 6: Develop Products and Services

After a license is granted, work with NASA to develop your products and services. Royalty revenues will be due based on sales and the agreed upon license terms. In some cases, NASA may wish to publicize licensing successes on its website, in NASA Spinoff, and other NASA publications.

Step 5: Negotiate a License Agreement

Work with the NASA licensing manager to negotiate and agree to business terms. Each license is negotiated individually and contains terms concerning practical application, license duration, up-front fees, ongoing royalties, exclusivity level, and more. The information you provide will assist in the negotiation process.

Step 4: Submit a Commercialization Plan

After NASA verifies the license application, more detailed information is needed to outline product development and marketing plans. An income pro forma that estimates expected revenue and sales for the licensed technology is also usually requested.

Step 3: Complete a License Application

In addition to information about a technology's proposed use, an application requires information about proposed business terms (fees, royalties, exclusivity). The NASA licensing manager will provide you with the application used by that Center—most require information similar to this sample, and all applications must fulfill the requirements of 37 CFR, Section 404, "Licensing of Government-Owned Inventions." NASA will review the application and determine whether the initial offer is within reason.

Step 2: Contact the Technology Transfer Office

NASA's technology transfer professionals are available to discuss licensing and partnership needs and objectives and can help you identify the right license for your situation (commercial, evaluation, etc.), as well as connect you to inventors for more details about innovations. The point of contact for each invention is listed on the specific technology page and will vary based on the originating NASA Center.

Step 1: Identify NASA Innovation:

Search NASA's Technology Portfolio for patented and patent pending technologies available for license. Also visit NASA's Software Catalog for available software.